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3 Vi 



THE CERAMIC WORK OF GERTRUD AND OTTO NATZLER 

A Retrospective Exhibition 

15th JUNE -14th AUGUST, 1966 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 
Lytton Gallery 



Cover: 97 88 102 



INTRODUCTION Gertrud and Otto Natzler 

have been our valued friends almost from the time they arrived here, late in 1938, bringing with 
them from Vienna practically nothing but their potter's wheel and kiln — the same wheel and kiln 
they are using today. They appeared with us each of the first five years they worked here, in the 
Museum exhibitions of 1939-43. And in 1944 we presented a one-man, or one-family show of 
Natzler ceramics. *#* In more than twenty years since then, during a career of extraordinary and 
so fruitful collaboration, the Natzlers by development and refinement of their art have won a dis- 
tinguished place in numberless exhibitions here and abroad. Gertrud's elegant forms and Otto's 
superb glazes now grace the collections of a half-hundred museums. •$* Long talked-about, a ret- 
rospective exhibition of the Natzlers' work now becomes our privilege. In this we cover the years 
1939-66 — that is, ceramics of the Los Angeles period, reluctantly omitting a few treasured pieces 
from the early Vienna years. Omitted too are Otto Natzler's sculptures and mobiles, and the fanciful 
pottery bells, which really require to be seen outdoors, in the moving air. (The bells, however, are 
represented in three large photomural panels.) ♦#* This collection could not have been brought 
together except for Otto's astounding record file. Selections have been made by the Natzlers them- 
selves, from twenty-three thousand examples recorded in that wonderful file! The result is here 
for your delight! G.N-W. 



PREFACE When an artist is given the opportunity 

of a retrospective exhibition by a major museum during his lifetime it makes him pause for contem- 
plation and reflection, for inquisitive evaluation of his work, aims, achievements. Viewed in retro- 
spect, the beginning does not seem so distant, the gap between it and the present seems to narrow, and 
despite the natural uncertainty beclouding the trend at the start, we feel there was a positive direc- 
tion from the outset. •$♦ The field we work in is ancient, yet little explored. It is hardly recognized by 
the public in general who do not associate pots made of ordinary clay with art, unless they happen 
to be old or decorated. Yet, the objects we make are pots, they are made of clay, they are made 
today and they are not decorated. Their possible function as containers is unimportant to us. We 
are concerned with the ceramic medium as such in an aesthetic sense, with what it has to offer, 
what it yields voluntarily, what must be extracted. To the exploration of a very fascinating medium 
we both have devoted our efforts. «$♦ It all started quite suddenly when, in 1933, we "discovered" 
simultaneously clay and each other. If it had not been for that rainy Sunday in July of 1933 we 
may never have met, and neither of us probably would have progressed very far with clay. As it 
happened, we did start work at practically the same time and, with the exception of a brief period 
at the beginning of our career, we have collaborated in nearly all our work. Our training was very 
limited, lasted less than a year and consisted of learning the elementary beginnings of "throwing" 



pots, the mechanics of glazing and firing and — fortunately for us — nothing further. Somehow, 
the medium itself seemed much more fascinating to us than the objects the immediate world 
around us produced from this medium. We both felt we did not want to "learn" and went into 
seclusion by renting our first studio in Vienna. *#* The following four years were spent search- 
ing and working in earnest. As we had no formal training, a period of intensive experimentation 
began, directed to exploring any reaction related to the medium. Our lack of knowledge went 
hand in hand with a lack of inhibitions. It made us try methods, materials and combinations of 
materials nobody with any knowledge of the subject would have tried. The results were in keeping 
with such ignorance, quite devastating at times. Efforts directed toward achieving an ordinary 
glaze resulted in crusty surfaces, full of pockmarks, holes and blisters. On the other hand, this 
wild and seemingly methodless exploration yielded an immense wealth of experience on the reac- 
tions of various materials under different conditions and in a variety of combinations. Many of 
these early experiments led to an immediate personal experience which was to become the basis 
of many later developments. Throughout all this often planless searching we did one thing reli- 
giously: I kept a methodical record of all experiments. This proved extremely helpful later, when 
our exploration took on a more organized pattern. ♦$* The direction in our work became apparent. 
Like so many others who walk a narrow path in a vast field, we chose to limit ourselves. We focused 



our interest on exploring form in its totality — searching for perfection of outline and proportion 
— and relating to it color and texture of the surface. Within the range of the medium we attempted 
to penetrate it in depth. •$* We are not attracted to the large scale in a pot; it is the intimate that 
attracts us. We feel that pottery is to the visual arts what chambermusic is to the art of music. 
The form is all-important. It is concise and abstract, and as such it should tell the whole story 
without any additional ornament, except for the "natural" surface with the intimate variation of 
tone-color and texture inherent in the medium. ♦#* The medium itself is earth, water and 
fire — a composite of these primeval elements of nature. Earth, Water and Fire is the clay from 
which the form is created. Earth, Water and Fire is the surface of glassy substance bonded to the 
clay. ♦$* It is strange that in exploring our medium we should explore its components individually, 
quasi one at a time. The years 1939 to 1950 were devoted to the exploration of "Earth." The 
earliest experiments led to the "Pompeian" glazes, very dry, barely developed and very earthy in 
texture. From these came the lavas with their porous looking rough surfaces and still later the 
volcanic crater glazes. All of these had their roots in my first haphazard experiments in the pursuit 
of developing an ordinary ceramic glaze. *$♦ In 1942 I started the first experiments devoted to 
the exploration of "Fire" by introducing the fascinating phenomenon of reduction into our work. 
Up to that time I used only heat to develop colors and textures. With reduction several new 



elements were introduced. We made positive use of the dynamics of the "physical fire," its raw 
open flame, its drafts, smoke and ashes and unburned carbons, and, foremost of all, the elimina- 
tion of oxygen during the firing process. We let this fire react with the hot viscous glaze to leave 
distinctive marks on its surface. Fire thus ceases to be just part of the process, a vehicle to develop 
heat; it becomes instead a vital part of the ceramic medium itself. 4* Only as recently as 1955 did 
I embark on the exploration of "Water" in earnest. The term water has to be taken in a rather 
extended sense; it involves phenomena that occur in a glaze during its liquid state at high tempera- 
tures. This includes the downward movement of the fluid glaze by gravity, resulting in separations 
of some of its ingredients and accumulations on horizontal planes. It involves research into solu- 
tions, crystallization and devitrification of a glaze. It involves firing techniques to permanently re- 
tain these effects in the glaze after solidification. 4* Although I make use of whatever knowledge 
of chemistry and physics I possess, I never work out plans to the very end. I like the accidental 
element which, even though controlled, can often be full of the surprises only nature can produce. 
4* So much about the medium which, in a good pot, we like to see represented by all three of its 
basic elements properly integrated, subservient to our aesthetic aims. To us the pot itself has mean- 
ing not as a utilitarian object, but rather as the abstract form which, in its emptiness, holds the 
fullness of its content. «$• The metamorphosis from the crude mass of clay to the finished pot is 



slow; it involves many manipulations and natural changes in the process which may upset its deli- 
cate equilibrium. That pot is rare indeed in which the swirl of fingermarks in the center relates to 
the form and all of its dimensions. It is a rare pot in which the dynamism of its outline relates in 
full to the dynamism of its surface, where all components of the medium are present and retained 
to tell their story. 4* We believe in evolution, in an aesthetic expression of our thoughts in an 
expressive medium. We believe in using our fantasy, inspiration, emotions and dreams, but also 
in restraint when translating them into our work. The really perfect pot has not yet been made and 
probably never will be. Yet we reach for perfection, and, if we are fortunate, the next pot we make 
may come closer to our visions. If it does, we shall be grateful. Which somehow sums up our credo. 

OTTO NATZLER 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

Our first thanks are due Gertrud and Otto Natzler, for painstaking selection 

of all examples and for every sort of cooperation. 

The lenders have been wonderfully kind, in giving such earnest support. 

We are grateful to Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry, and to Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Greenberg, 

for special assistance with the catalogue; 

to Julius Shulman for his sensitive and beautiful photography; 

to Helene Winer who compiled the bibliography. Warm thanks go also to 

the following, who have given and arranged for willing help: 

Henry T. Hopkins, Frieda Kay Fall, Elliott Hutchinson, Carolyn Rust. 

Particularly, we thank Matthew Matter for his faithful and patient services. 

G.N-W. 



CATALOG 

1 Tea Service. 1 939. Old ivory mat glaze. Lent by Mr. and Mrs. John L. Offutt. 

2 Bowl. 1940. "Pompeian" sand glaze. D. 9" (23 cm). Lent by the Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego. 

3 Bowl. 1940. Green-brown "Pompeian" mat glaze. D. 6%" (17 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

4 Bowl. 1941. Sea green translucent glaze. D. 9 Vz" (24 cm). Lent by the Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego. 

5 Bowl. 1942. Mat copper reduction glaze with irridescence. D. 9 5 /s" (24'/2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Dalzell Hatfield. 

6 Oval Bowl. 1 942. Celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 1014 /6%" (26/ 1 7 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzle 

7 Bowl. 1942. Eggshell mat glaze with molten quartz. D. Wi" (24 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Kugel. 

8 Bowl. 1943. Grey lava glaze with turquoise overflow. D. 8V2" (21 Vi cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

9 Bowl. 1944. Flame red mat glaze. D. 8 5 /8" (22 cm). Lent by the Cincinnati Art Museum. 

1 Bowl. 1 944. "Pompeian"' red mat glaze. D. 5Vz" ( 1 3 X A cm ) . Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

1 1 Bowl. 1944. Celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 5Va" (131/2 cm). Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Dalzell Hatfield. 1946. 

1 2 Pear-shaped Bottle. 1 944. Grey celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. AV2" ( 1 1 V2 cm) . Lent by 
Miss Elizabeth Gordon. 

13 Bowl. 1945. Yellow-grey reduction glaze. D. 7!4" ( I8V2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

14 Bowl. 1945. Oxblood reduction glaze with melt fissures and irridescence. D. 5'/2" (14 cm). Lent by 
Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

1 5 Conical Vase. 1 945. Gunmetal crystalline mat glaze. H. IVv," ( 1 8 cm) . Lent by the Museum of Modern Art. 

16 Bowl. 1946. Blue "Pompeian" lava glaze with heavy drop. D. IVz" ( 19 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Fields. 

17 Bowl. 1946. "Pompeian" glaze, variation 29 (tan).D. \VA" (33 ] /2 cm). Lent by the Walker Art Center. 
1 8 Pear-shaped Vase. 1 946. Grey, red and green reduction glaze. H. AV2" ( 1 1 V2 cm ) . Lent by Edward J. Wormley. 

19 Round Bottle. 1946. Tiger eye reduction glaze with melt fissures and oil spots. H. 814" (21 cm). Lent by Alden B. Dow. 

20 Vase. 1946. Peachblossom reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 5Va" (13 cm). Lent by the Everson Museum of Art. 

21 Vase. 1946. Grey-green reduction glaze. H. 9 1/2" (24 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

22 Bowl. 1946. Patina mat glaze. D. 1 1 V2" (29 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

23 Oval Bowl. 1946. Patina mat glaze. D. 14% / 11%" (37»/2 /29!/2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Oscar Moss. 

24 Bowl. 1 946. Old turquoise mat glaze. D. IVa, " ( 1 8V2 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

25 Double-curved Bowl. 1947. Dawn celadon reduction glaze. D. IV2" ( 19 cm). Lent by Miss Mary Strobel. 



26 Bowl. 1948. Grey celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. bVi" ( 16'/2cm ). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hammid. 

27 Bottle. 1 948. Blue tiger eye reduction glaze. H. 6" ( 1 5 cm ) . Lent by the Art Institute of Chicago. 

28 Bowl. 1948. Red crater glaze. D. 6 1 V ( \5Vi cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Norton Simon. 

29 Bowl. 1948. Yellow crater glaze. D. 8" (20'/2 cm). Lent by the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. 

30 Bowl. 1948. Grey celadon reduction glaze, heavily flowing. D. AV2" ( 1 1 Vi cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

3 1 Bowl. 1 949. Dove grey celadon reduction glaze. D. 4>/8" ( 1 0'/2 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

32 Bowl. 1949. Peach blossom reduction glaze with irridescence. D. 4Vn" ( IOI/2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

33 Bowl. 1949. Flame red mat glaze. D. 9" (23 cm). Lent by the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. 

34 Double-curved Bowl. 1950. Sang reduction glaze. D. 4%" ( MV2 cm). Lent by the Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, 
Gift in Memory of Carolyn Rees. 

35 Bowl. 1 950. Sang reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 5 l A" ( 13 V2 cm) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

36 Bottle. 1951. Sulphur crater glaze. H. 21" (53!/2" cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Jones. 

37 Bowl. 1951. Grey lavastone glaze. D. 6" ( 1 5 cm ) . Lent by Miss Giselle Studer. 

38 Bowl. 1 95 1 . Ivory celadon reduction glaze with smoke traces. D. 7%" (20 cm) . Lent by the Everson Museum of Art. 

39 Bowl. 195 1 . Blue tinge celadon reduction glaze. D. 4" ( 10 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

40 Bottle. 1951. Grey-green celadon reduction glaze. H. 21 5 /s" (55 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin A. Lipps. 

41 Bowl. 1952. Heavy pale yellow flowing glaze on black polished clay. D. 814" (21 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

42 Bowl. 1952. Dark tiger eye reduction glaze. D. 8'/2" (21 Vi cm ) . Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase 
1954, Edward C. Moore, Jr., Gift. 

43 Bottle. 1 952. Slate grey mat glaze. H. 9 7 /s " ( 25 cm ) . Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase 1 954, 
Edward C. Moore. Jr., Gift. 

44 Bowl. 1953. Light tiger eye reduction glaze. D. 8" (20'/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Adler. 

45 Bowl. 1953. Sang reduction glaze. D. 4" ( 10 cm). Lent by the University of Nebraska, F.M. Hall Collection. 

46 Bowl. 1953. Aventurine crystalline glaze. D. IV2" (19 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Greenberg. 

47 Bowl. 1954. Moss green and sang reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 6'/8" ( 15!/2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

48 Double-curved Bottle. 1954. Moss green and sang reduction glaze. H. 10" (25'/2 cm). Lent by Walter H. Simson. 

49 Bowl. 1 954. Cat's eye reduction glaze. D. 7 1 /s" ( 1 8 cm) . Lent by the San Francisco Museum of Art, 
Gift in Memory of Carolyn Rees. 

50 Spherical Bottle. 1954. Tiger eye reduction glaze with smoke traces. H. 6" (15 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

51 Bottle. 1954. Sang reduction glaze. H. 7%" (20 cm). Lent by the San Francisco Museum of Art, 
Gift in Memory of Carolyn Rees. 



52 Bottle. 1954. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. lOW (26 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Max Ascoli. 

53 Bottle. 1954. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. 10 3 4" (27'/2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

54 Double-curved Bottle. 1 955. Peachbloom reduction glaze. H. 6" (15 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

55 Bowl. 1955. White crater glaze. D. 8 3 /4" (22 cm). Lent by Kantonales Gewerbemuseum Bern. 

56 Long-necked Bottle. 1955. Tiger eye reduction glaze. H. 20%" (53 cm). Lent by Mrs. Dalzell Hatfield. 

57 Covered Jar. 1955. Slate grey mat glaze. D. 6" ( 15 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin A. Lipps. 

58 Bottle. 1956. Mystic blue glaze, flowing. H. 12 5 /h" (32 cm). Lent by Mrs. Dalzell Hatfield. 

59 Bottle. 1956. Tiger eye reduction glaze. H. 1 3" (33 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Dickerman. 

60 Bottle. 1956. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. 15" (38 cm). Lent by Walter H. Simson. 

61 Bowl. 1956. Grey earth crater glaze. D. 1 3" (33 cm). Lent by the Everson Museum of Art. 

62 Double-curved Bottle. 1956. Green crater glaze. H. 20%" (53 cm). Lent by Norman M. Kelly. 

63 Bowl. 1956. Pale green and black crater glaze. D. 13%" (34Vi cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

64 Bowl. 1956. Turquoise crater glaze. D. 19" (48 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

65 Bowl. 1957. Purple-brown reduction glaze. D. 6" (15 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

66 Chalice. 1957. Red "Nocturne" reduction glaze. H. IVa" (I8V2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. John R. Womer. 

67 Footed Bowl. 1957. Red "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 5%" (13 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler 

68 Vase with Flaring Top. 1957. Sang "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures and flame marks. H. 19%" (50 cm). 
Lent by Walter H. Simson. 

69 Oval Bowl. 1957. Steel blue mat glaze. D. 2QVa" / 14%" (51 1/2/36 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

70 Bowl. 1957. Sea green mat glaze. D. 13%" (341/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Nowling. 

71 Double-curved Bowl. 1957. Lapis blue glaze with crystal formations. D. XAVi" (37 cm). Lent by Miss Giselle Studer. 

72 Bottle. 1957. Turquoise crater glaze. H. 20% " (53 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Dickerman. 

73 Plate. 1 958. Red crystalline glaze. D. 17%" (44 cm) . Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Benton. 

74 Bottle. 1958. Orange-red glaze. H. 19" (48'/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Neustatter. 

75 Bowl. 1958. Peach blossom reduction glaze. D. AV2 " (IW2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

76 Vasejorm. 1959. Green-brown glaze with crystal formations. H. 9" (23 cm ) . Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

77 Bottle with Flaring Top. 1 959. Flame red mat glaze. H. 26'/2" (61 V2 cm) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

78 Flat Double-curved Bowl. 1 959. Blue crystalline glaze. D. 15%" (40 cm). Lent by the Phoenix Art Museum. 

79 Bowl. 1959. Yellow and black crater glaze. D. 1 5%" (39 cm) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 



80 Teardrop Bottle. 1959. Steel blue mat glaze. H. 10" (25Vi cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Hull. 

81 Vase. 1 960. Orange-red glaze. H. 6" ( 1 5 cm ) . Lent by Gcrtrud and Otto Natzler. 

82 Bowl. 1 960. Sang and olive reduction glaze. D. 4%" ( 12'/2 cm). Lent by the Phoenix Art Museum. 

83 Bottle. 1960. Green crystalline glaze. H. 15'/2" (39 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

84 Round Bottle. 1960. Bluish grey crater glaze. H. 16'/2" (42 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Milton Hirsch. 

85 Bottle. 1960. Tiger eye reduction glaze. H. 1 9 '/«" (48 V2 cm). Lent by the Phoenix Art Museum. 

86 Bottle. 1 960. Patina mat glaze. H. 26" ( 66 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

87 Bowl. 1 960. Apple green reduction glaze with melt fissures and firemarks. D. 4 1 h" ( 10'/2 cm ) . 
Lent by Mrs. Alfred S. Alschuler. 

88 Bottle. 1960. Apple green reduction glaze with melt fissures and firemarks. H. 8%" (llVi cm). 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

89 Bottle with Flange Top. 1960. Apple green reduction glaze. H. 10" (25!/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Milton Hirsch. 

90 Bowl. 1961 . Copper reduction glaze. D. 4'/2" (11 V2 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

91 Vase. 1961 . Red and dark green •'Nocturne'* reduction glaze with crystal formations. H. dVs" ( 15Vi cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

92 Bowl. 1961. Blue "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures and oil spots. D. 6" ( 1 5 cm ) . 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

93 Pot with Flaring Top. 1961 . Blue and gold "Nocturne" glaze with crystal formations. H. 8%" (22 cm). 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Leon Polsky. 

94 Vase. 1961. Blue tiger eye reduction glaze with oil spots. H. 6" (15'/2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

95 Bowl. 1961. Blue "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 6V2" ( I6V2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

96 Pot with Flaring Top. 1961. Blue "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 6% " (17Vi cm). 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry, Jr. 

97 Teardrop Bottle. 1961. Grey celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures and carbon deposits. H. 9Vi" (24 cm). 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

98 Teardrop Bottle. 1961 . "Nocturne" red and blue reduction glaze. H. 6 3 4" ( 17 cm). Lent by Miss Giselle Studer. 

99 Teardrop Bottle. 1961 . Green "Mariposa" reduction glaze with blue blush. H. 11" (28 cm). Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

100 Square Pinched Pot. 1961. Red mat glaze. H. 4" ( 10 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Muir Dawson. 

101 Round Bottle with Flange. 1961. Red "Nocturne" reduction glaze. H. 5 l A" ( 1 3Vi cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

102 Vase. 1961 . "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystalline formations and melt fissures, red blush. H. 6Vs" (15'/i cm). 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 



103 Teardrop Bottle. 1961 . "Midnight sky" deep blue glaze with crystal formations. H. \0Va" (26 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

104 Bottle. 1961. Blue crystalline glaze. H. 1014" (26cm). Lent by the Smithsonian Institution. U.S. National Museum. 

105 Bowl. 1961. "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. D. 4%" (11 cm). Lent by Miss Mary Strobel. 

1 06 Bowl. 1961. Red copper reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 4 Va " (11 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 07 Bowl. 1961. Verdigris crater glaze with drop. D. 7 Va" (\%Vi cm ) . Lent by the Museum of Modern Art. 

108 Bowl. 1961. Pale yellow and green crater glaze. D. 5" {YlVi cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Greenberg. 

109 Bottle. 1961. Green glaze with crystal formations. H. 8 5 /s" (22 cm). Lent by the E. B. Crocker Art Gallery. 

110 Bottle. 1961. Red mat glaze, rough texture. H. AVa" ( 12 cm). Lent by T. Thornton Oxnard. 

11 1 Bowl. 1961. Red "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. D. AVz" (W/i cm). 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Greenberg. 

1 12 Bowl. 1961. Orange-red crater glaze. D. 8 3 /s" (21 Va cm). Lent by the Smithsonian Institution, U.S. National Museum. 

1 13 Bowl. 1961. Sang and green "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. D. 4%" ( 12!/i cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. . 

114 Bowl. 1962. Sang "Nocturne" reduction glaze, hare's-fur. green inside. D. 5%" ( 14Vi cm). 
Lent by Dr. and Mrs. Morton Blaustein. 

115 Cylindrical Pot. 1962. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. 5V»" (13 cm). Lent by Miss Elizabeth Gordon. 

1 16 Bowl. 1962. Dark tiger eye reduction glaze. D. 6" ( 15 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

117 Bottle. 1962. Tiger eye reduction glaze. H. SVa" (21 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 1 8 Round Bottle. 1 962. Green and blue "Mariposa" reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 6V2" {\6 l /z cm ) . 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 19 Massive Bowl. 1962. Turquoise green mat glaze. D. IVa" ( I8V2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Norton Simon. 

120 Bowl. 1962. Apple green reduction glaze with black fire markings. D. 4%"( 12!/2cm).Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hammid 

121 Bowl. 1962. Apple green reduction glaze with fire marks and melt fissures. D. 6% "(\1Vi cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler 

122 Bottle. 1962. Blue and green "Mariposa" reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 8% "(22!/2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzle 

123 Cone-shaped Bowl. 1962. "Mariposa" reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 9"(23 cm). Lent by Dr. and Mrs. Morton Grossman 

124 Bottle. 1962. Red "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. H. MVs"{4V/2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 25 Vase Form. 1 962. Sang "Nocturne" glaze with crystal formations. H. \6Vs" (41 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

126 Vase. 1962. "Nocturne" green and red reduction glaze with crystal formations. H. 1 \W (29V6 cm). 
Lent by the Art Institute of Chicago. 

127 Spherical Bottle. 1962. Dark red flowing mat glaze. H. 6%" ( 17'/i cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Jones. 



128 Double-curved Wise. 1962. Green crystalline glaze. H. 8V2" (21 Vi cm ). Lent by Mrs. Albert F. Sperry. 

129 Bowl. 1962. ""Mariposa" reduction glaze. D. 6" ( 15 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Gerald M. Fields. 

130 Footed Bowl. 1962. Tiger eye reduction glaze with sang spot. D. 6 1 h" ( 15'/2 cm ). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Jones. 

1 3 I Bowl. 1 962. Sang and green "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. D. 1 1 V2" (29Va cm ) . 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Milton Hirsch. 

1 32 Teardrop Bottle. 1 962. Sang and green reduction glaze. H. 8V2" (21 V2 cm ) . Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

133 Pot. 1962. Ivory celadon reduction glaze. D. 5'/h" ( 13 cm). Lent by Miss MaryStrobel. 

134 Pot. 1962. "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. H. 3%" (9'/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Manker. 

135 Bottle. 1962. Pale blue "Mariposa" reduction glaze. H. 8>/ 2 " (21 V2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Shawn. 

136 Bowl. 1962. Gold hare's-fur glaze. D. 6%" (17 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Ullman. 

1 37 Double-curved Bowl. 1963. Apricot reduction glaze. D. 4%" ( 12V4 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

138 Chalice. 1963. Blue and green "Mariposa" reduction glaze. H. 9V2" (24 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

139 Pinched Bottle. 1963. Blue and sang reduction glaze with melt fissures and irridescence. H. 9Vi" (24 cm). 
Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Kugel. 

140 Bowl. 1963. Gold hare's-fur glaze. D. 6" ( 15 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Norton Simon. 

141 Bottle. 1963. Gold hare's-fur glaze. H 8 7 /«" (22 Vi cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. William Kugel. 

142 Bowl. 1963. Green crystalline glaze. D. 11 5 h" (29'/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dutton Lynch. 

143 Double-curved Bowl. 1963. Old turquoise glaze. D. 4%" ( 12 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dutton Lynch. 

144 Bowl. 1963. Ivory-sulphur crater glaze. D. IVs" ( 1 8 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Leon Polsky. 

145 Bowl. 1963. Tiger eye reduction glaze with fire markings. D. 5%" ( 14'/2 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry, Ji 

146 Bowl. 1963. Tiger eve reduction glaze. D. 9 l A" (23 ',4 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

147 Pot. 1963. "Nocturne" olive and magenta reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 8%" (22'/2 cm). 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry, in Memory of Leonard M. Sperry. 

148 Bowl. 1963. Olive, sang and black reduction glaze with smoke traces and melt fissures. D. 4%" ( 12'/2 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

149 Spherical Pot. 1963. '"Nocturne" blue and sang reduction glaze with red spots. D. 6%" ( 17 cm). 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

1 50 Double-curved Bowl. 1 964. Orange and brown crater glaze. D. 6" ( 1 5 cm ) . Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Norton Simon. 

151 Bowl. 1964. Brown-green and black crater glaze with drop. D. IV2" (19 cm). Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Dan Lutz. 

152 Long-necked Bottle. 1964. "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures and burns. H. 23V4" (59 cm ). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 



1 53 Double-curved Bowl. 1964. Green crater glaze. D. 5 3 A" ( 1414 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 54 Double-curved Bowl. 1 964. Rose "Mariposa" reduction glaze with red blush. D. 4W (11 cm ) . Lent by Walter H. Simson. 

155 Double-curved Bowl. 1964. Sang and green "Nocturne" reduction glaze with crystal formations. D. 4Vn" (1214 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

156 Vasejorm. 1 964. Green crater glaze. H. 1 \ 3 A" (30 cm). Lent by the E. B. Crocker Art Gallery. 

1 57 Squat Bottle. 1 964. Turquoise-silverblack glaze. D. 6 3 /8" ( 1 614 cm ) . Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Keating Coffee. 

158 Teardrop Bottle. 1965. Green and sang reduction glaze with large melt fissures. H. V/%" (20 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

159 Vasejorm. 1965. Blue and rose "Mariposa" reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 8' (2014 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

160 Teardrop Bottle. 1 965. Green and blue reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 14%" (37>4 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

161 Spherical Pot. 1965. Grey green reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 7%" ( 19Vi cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

162 Bowl. 1965. Blue and sang crystalline reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 7!/s" ( 1 8 cm). 
Lent by Dr. and Mrs. Alexander S. Rogawski. 

163 Bowl. 1965. Apple green and black reduction glaze with melt fissures and smoke traces. D. 6Vh" ( 151/2 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

164 Bottle. 1965. Celadon reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 4'/8" ( IOV2 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

165 Footed Bowl. 1965. Black and red glaze. D. 8" (20*4 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

166 Pot. 1965. Blue "Mariposa" reduction glaze with melt fissures and smoke traces. D. 6Vi" ( \5 l A cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

167 Footed Bowl. 1965. Sang and blue "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures. D. 6" ( 1514 cm). 
Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

168 Bottle. 1965. Copper red reduction glaze with melt fissures. H. 15%" (39 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 
1 69 Bottle. 1965. Sang and green "Nocturne" reduction glaze. H. 8V4" (21 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 70 Bottle. 1 965. Sang "Nocturne" reduction glaze with melt fissures and irridescence. H. 614 " ( 1 614 cm ) . 
Lent by Mrs. Leonard M. Sperry. 

171 Bowl. 1965. Moss green hare's-fur glaze. D. 8'/8" (20'4 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

172 Bottle. 1966. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. I 1 3 4" (30 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 
1 73 Pot. 1 966. Cat's eye reduction glaze. H. 6% " ( 1 7 cm ) . Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

174 Pot. 1966. Cat's eye reduction glaze with melt fissures and fire marks. H. 6%" (1714 cm). Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 

1 75 Miniatures. 1 965- 1 966. Group of miniature pots. Lent by Gertrud and Otto Natzler. 




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MUSEUM COLLECTIONS 

Arizona State College. Tempe 

Art Institute of Chicago. Illinois 

Baltimore Museum of Art. Maryland 

Birger Sandzen Memorial Gallery, Lindsborg, Kansas 

California State lair. Sacramento 

Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio 

Cranbrook Academy of Art. Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 

E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, Sacramento, California 

Dallas Museum o\ Fine Arts. Texas 

Detroit Institute of Arts. Michigan 

Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York 

Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, California 

Fort Worth Museum of Art, Texas 

Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Texas 

Joslyn Art Museum. Omaha, Nebraska 

Kantonales Gewerbemuseum Bern, Switzerland 

Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, Urbana 

Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zurich, Switzerland 

La Crosse State College, Indiana 

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City 

Museo Internazionale delle Ceramiche. Faenza, Italy 

Museum of Modern Art, New York City 

Newark Museum of Art, New Jersey 

Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 

Oakland Art Museum, California 

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania 

Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona 

Portland Museum of Art, Oregon 

Saint Paul Art Center. Minnesota 

San Francisco Museum of Art. California 

Seattle Art Museum. Washington 

Slater Memorial Museum, Norwich, Connecticut 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Springfield Art Museum. Missouri 

University of California at Los Angeles, California 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

University of Oregon, Eugene 

University of Wisconsin. Madison 

Walker Art Center. Minneapolis, Minnesota 



EXHIBITIONS 

ONE-MA V EXHIBITIONS 

1940 Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego. California 
1 942 Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, California 

1943 San Francisco Museum of Art. California 

1944 1 os Angeles County Museum. California 

1946 Maija Grotell Natzler. The Art Institute of Chicago, 

Illinois 
1946 Wildenhain Longenecker, Natzler. Art Gallery, 

School of Architecture, University of Oregon, Eugene 
1953 La Jolla Art Center. California 
1 954 Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio 
1955 Joslyn Art Museum. Omaha, Nebraska 
1955 Springfield Art Museum, Missouri 

1958 The Jewish Museum, New York City 

1959 Bezalel National Museum, Jerusalem 
1959 Museum of Modern Art. Haifa, Israel 

1 959 Kunstgeu erbemuseum. Zurich, Switzerland 
1959 Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Holland 
1 960 Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio 
1 96 1 Tulane University. New Orleans, Louisiana 
1963 The Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois 
1963 San Francisco Museum of Art, California 
1963 St. Paul Art Center, Minnesota 

1963 Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York City 

1964 Birger Sandzen Memorial Gallery. Lindsborg. Kansas 
EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL 

1 937 World Exposition. Paris. France. Pavilion of Austria. 

Silver Medal Award 
1 940 World Lxposition, San Francisco, California. "Art in 

Action." Fine Arts Palace (Invited) 

1951 Industrie und Handwerk USA. Stuttgart, Germany 
(Invited) 

1 952 Design for Use, USA. XXIe Salon des Arts Menagers. 
Grand Palais. Paris. France (Invited) 

1955 Premier Festival International de la Ceramique, Cannes, 
France. Palais des Festival 

1957 Artisians-Techniciens aux Etats-Unis, Paris 
France (and traveling throughout Europe) 

( Invited) 

1 958 Worlds Fair. Brussels. Belgium. United States 
Pavilion ( Invited by ACC) 

1958 XXth Ceramic International, Everson Museum of Art, 
Syracuse. New York ( and on circuit to six other 
museums. 1959-60). Purchase Award 

1959 La Ceramique Contemporaine. Musee des Beaux-Arts, 
Ostendc, Belgium (Invited) 

1959 Amerikanischc Keramik. Stuttgart, Germany (Invited) 



1960 Moderne Amerikansk Keramik. Copenhagen, Denmark 

(Invited) 
1962 Amerikanische Keramik 1960/62. International 

Ceramic Exhibition at Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

Silver Medal Award ( Invited by USIA) 
1 964 International Exhibition of Contemporary Ceramic Art. 

National Museum, Tokyo, Japan (Invited) 
1 966 Exhibition of American Studio Pottery. Victoria & 

Albert Museum, London ( Invited) 
NATIONAL 
1 939 8th Annual National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse 

M useum of Fine Arts, New York ( and on circuit to 

seven other museums, 1939-40). Purchase Award for 

Pottery 
1 940 9th Annual National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse 

Museum of Fine Arts, New York (and on circuit to six 

other museums, 1 940-4 1 ) . Katherine Payne Memorial 

Award for Pottery (Invited) 
1941 10th National Ceramics Exhibition, "Contemporary 

Ceramics of the Western Hemisphere," Syracuse 

M useum of Fine Arts, New York ( and on circuit to 

four other museums, 1942). Award for Pottery (Invited) 

1946 I 1th National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse Museum 
of Fine Arts, New York ( and on circuit to eleven other 
museums, 1 947 ) . Award for Group of Pottery 

1 947 I 2th National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse Museum 
of Fine Arts, New York ( and on circuit to nine other 
museums, 1948) 

1 948 1 3th National Ceramics Exhibition. Syracuse Museum 
of Fine Arts, New York (and on circuit to ten other 
museums, 1949) 

1 949 2nd National Biennial Exhibition of Textiles and 
Ceramics, Museum of Cranbrook Academy of Art, 
Bloomfield Hills. Michigan (Invited) 

1 949 1 4th National Ceramics Exhibition. Syracuse Museum 

of Fine Arts, New York (and on circuit to eleven other 

museums, 1950) 
1 95 1 3rd National Biennial Exhibition of Textiles and 

Ceramics, Museum of Cranbrook Academy of Art, 

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (Invited) 
1951 1 6th National Ceramics Exhibition. Syracuse Museum 

of Fine Arts. New York (and on circuit to seven other 

museums, 1952-53) 

1953 4th National Biennial Exhibition of Textiles and 
Ceramics, Museum of Cranbrook Academy of Art, 
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan (Invited) 

1 954 1 8th National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse Museum 
oi Fine Arts, New York ( and on circuit to four other 
museums, 1955) 



1956 19th National Ceramics Exhibition, Syracuse Museum 

of Fine Arts. New York ( and on circuit to eight other 

museums. 1957-58). Purchase Award 
I960 XXIst Ceramic National, Everson Museum of Art. 

Syracuse, New York (and on circuit to eight other 

museums, 1961-62). Prize Award for Pottery 
1962 22nd Ceramic National. Everson Museum of Art, 

Syracuse, New York ( and on circuit to eight other 

museums. 1963-64) 
1 964 23rd Ceramic National, Everson Museum of Art, 

Syracuse, New York 
OTHERS 



1939 



1939 



1940 



1940 



1940 



1941 



942 



1943 



1944 



1945 



946 



1947 



1947 



1949 



1949 



1949 



1951 



1951 



2nd California Ceramics Exhibition, Eos Angeles 
County Museum, California, and traveling on circuit 
Exhibition of Decorative Arts, Denver Art Museum, 
Colorado ( Invited) 

Artists of Los Angeles and Vicinity, Los Angeles County 
Museum. California 1st Honorable Mention 
Contemporary European / American Decorative Arts, 
Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio (Invited ) 
Contemporary American Industrial Art, Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, New York City (Invited) 
Artists of Los Angeles and Vicinity, Los Angeles 
County Museum. California. 1st Honorable Mention 
Artists of Los Angeles and Vicinity, Los Angeles County 
Museum, California 

Useful Objects, Museum of Modern Art, New York 
City (Invited) 

Artists of Los Angeles and Vicinity, 4th Annual, 
Los Angeles County Museum, California 
Contemporary American Crafts, Baltimore Museum 
of Art, Maryland ( Invited) 
California Ceramics Exhibition, Scripps College, 
Claremont, California ( Invited) 

Contemporary Ceramics Exhibition, Walker Art Center, 
Minneapolis. Minnesota (Invited) 
2nd Bi-Annual Ceramics Exhibition, Scripps College, 
Claremont. California ( Invited) 

100 Useful Objects of Fine Design, Museum of Modern 
Art, New York City- 
Design in the Living Room, San Francisco Museum of 
Art, California ( Invited) 

Decorative Arts and Ceramics Exhibition, Wichita Art 
Association, Kansas (Invited) 

An Exhibition for Modern Living, Detroit Institute of 
Arts, Michigan (Invited) 

Ceramics Exhibition, Morrill Hall, University of 
Nebraska. Lincoln (Invited) 

The Work of Contemporary American Craftsmen, 
University of Illinois, Urbana (Invited) 



1 95 1 34 American Artists, University Gallery, Department 
of Art, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Invited) 

1952 Sculpturc-Ceramics-Weaving, University of Wisconsin, 
Madison ( Invited) 

1952 6000 Years of Art in Clay. Art Building, Los Angeles 
County Fair, Pomona, California (Invited) 

1 955 6 1 st Western Annual, Denver Art Museum, Colorado 
( Invited) 

1955 California Designed, Long Beach Museum of Art, 
California (Invited) 

1 956 Craftsmanship in a Changing World, Museum of 
Contemporary Crafts. New York City (Invited) 

1956 62nd Western Annual, Denver Art Museum, Colorado 

( Invited) 
1 959 Fiber-Clay-Metal, St. Paul Gallery and School of Art, 

Minnesota (Invited) 

1959 The American Craftsman 1959, University of Illinois, 
Urbana 

1 960 Arts of Southern California, VI — Ceramics, Long 
Beach Museum of Art ( and on circuit to seven other 
museums, 1960-61) (Invited) 

1 960 Forms from the Earth : 1 000 Years of Pottery in 
America, Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York 
City (Invited) 

1 96 1 Dedication Exhibition, Krannert Art Museum, 
University of Illinois, Urbana. Museum Purchase 

1 962 Exhibition of Contemporary American Ceramics, 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. (Invited) 

1 962 Clay Today, Department of Art, School of Fine Arts, 
State University of Iowa, Iowa City ( Invited) 

1 963 Exhibition of Art Objects Collected by the Faculty of 
the University of Illinois, Krannert Art Museum, 
University of Illinois, Urbana 

1 963 Pottery and Ceramics, University of Maine Art Gallery, 
Orono, Maine ( Invited) 

1 964 Fiber-Clay-Metal : 7th Biennial, St. Paul Art Center, 
Minnesota 

1 964 The American Craftsman, Museum of Contemporary 
Crafts. New York City ( Invited) 

1965 California Crafts IV, E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, 
Sacramento (Invited) 

1 965 California Design 9, Pasadena Art Museum, California 

(Invited) 
1 965 California Artists. Witte Memorial Museum, San 

Antonio Texas (Invited) 

1965 Collector: Object/Environment, Museum of 
Contemporary Crafts, New York City (Invited) 

1 966 Ceramic Arts USA 1 966, International Minerals & 
Chemical Corporation, Skokie, Illinois (Invited) 



SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

(Chronological) 
Compiled by Helene Winer 



1939 "Austrian Refugee Couple Pursue Ceramic Craft 
Here," Los Angeles Times, March 10, 1939, Part II, 
p. l.illus. 

"Pottery Group — Gertrud and Otto Natzler," Design, 
vol. 41. no. 3, November 1939, p. 13, illus. 

1940 Dalzell Hatfield Gallery. Los Angeles. Natzlers 
[Catalogues for exhibitions held from 1940 to present, 
illus.]. 

Hodel, Emilia. "Ceramists Demonstrate Skill at Fair," 
San Francisco News, July 12, 1940, p. 13, illus. 
"Natzler Duo to Discuss Ceramic Work," San Diego 
Union, May 19, 1940, Part C, p. 7. 
Poland, Reginald. "Dr. Wedgwood to Discuss 
Ceramic Show," San Diego Union, April 7, 1940, 
PartC, p. 7. 

1941 Andreson, Laura. "The Natzlers," California Arts 
and Architecture, vol. 58, July 1941, pp. 14-15, illus. 
"Pottery by Gertrud and Otto Natzler," Bulletin, 
Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts, vol. 3, October- 
December 1 94 1 , p. 13, illus. 

1942 Andrews, Julia G. "Review of One-Man Exhibition 

at the Fine Arts Gallery," San Diego Union, September 
6. 1942, PartC, p. 7. 

1 943 Frankenstein, Alfred. "World of Art and Music," 
San Francisco Chronicle, October 3, 1943. 

1 945 Breuning, Margaret. "Ceramics at Lilienfield Gallery," 
Art Digest, vol. 20, no. 6, December 15, 1945, p. 8. 
Weigle, Edith. "Woodware and Ceramic Art 
Exhibited," Chicago Tribune, March 12, 1945. 

1946 "American Ceramists Display Their Craft," A rt Digest, 
vol. 21, no. 4, November 15, 1946, p. 5, illus. 
English, Kay. "Ceramics Share Honors in Exhibit," 
Los Angeles Examiner, June 30, 1946, Part VI, p. 4, 
illus. 

"Hand Made Pottery and Porcelain," Everyday Art 

Quarterly, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, no. 2, Fall 

1946, p. 6, illus. 

Millier, Arthur. "Ceramicists and Painters' Shows 

Lauded for Artistry," Los Angeles Times, June 23, 

1946, Part III, p. 4. 

"Trends to Watch in Tomorrow's Design," Ceramic 

Industry, vol. 46, no. 4, April 1946, pp. 114-1 16, illus. 



1948 Henderson, Rose. "Gertrud and Otto Natzler," Design, 
vol. 49, January 1948, p. 14, illus. 
Henderson, Rose. "Masterpieces in Pottery," The 
Studio, vol. 136, no. 669, December 1948, pp. 186-187, 
illus. 

Little, Helen. 'Heirlooms of the Future," House 
Beautiful, vol. 90, April 1 948, pp. 1 02- 1 03, 200, illus. 
Askew, Rual. "Natzler Collection Rare Summer Treat," 
The Dallas Morning News, July 10, 1949, Part VI, 
p. 5, illus. 

"Mistakes are Their Fortune," Ceramic Industry, 
vol. 52, no. 5, May 1949, pp. 78-79, illus. 
?50 "Ceramics by Accident," Newsweek, vol. 35, no. 23, 
June 5, 1950, p. 82, illus. 

"Ceramic Works by Gertrud and Otto Natzler," 
Industrial Art News, Tokyo, Japan, vol. 18, no. 5, 
May 1950, pp. 30-33, illus. 

Penney, Janice. "The Natzlers, Masters of Ceramic Art," 
American Artist, vol. 14, no. 3, issue 133, March 1950, 
pp. 48-51, illus. 

Penney, Janice. "Refugee Ceramists Lead Way," 
Christian Science Monitor, May 29, 1950, illus. 
Pepis, Betty. "Intricate Glazes Enhance Ceramics," 
New York Times, May 24, 1 950, Part I, p. 34. 
)52 "Ceramics by Gertrud and Otto Natzler," Industrial 
Art News, Tokyo, Japan, vol. 20, no. 4, April-May 
1952, p. 28, illus. 

1953 "Ceramica Europea in California," Domus, no. 278, 
January 1953, p. 28, illus. 

Kellogg, Cynthia, "New Vases Suited to be Decoration," 
New York Times, June 17, 1953, Part I, p. 22, illus. 
McCluggage, Denise. "New Natzler Pottery is put on 
Exhibit at Wor-De-Klee," New York Herald Tribune, 
June 18, 1953, illus. 

1954 Millier, Arthur. "Ceramics by Natzlers in Aristocrat 
Class," Los Angeles Times, May 30, 1954, 

Part IV, p. 10. 

1 955 Braun, Reinhard A. "Kalifornische Wiener, Neues 
Oesterreich, Vienna, April 24, 1955. 

1956 Keating, Micheline. "The Natzler Ceramics," 
Tucson Daily Citizen, November 10, 1956, 

p. 15, illus. 

Montgomery, Marjorie. "Famous Potters in Dallas," 

The Dallas Morning News, December 12, 1956, illus. 

Wallance, Don. Shaping America's Products, New York: 

Reinhold Publishing Company, 1956, pp. 144, 156-157, 

illus. 



1957 Henderson, Rose. "Natzler Ceramics," The Studio, 
vol. 153.no. 766, January 1957, pp. 18-21, illus. 
Massard, Jack. "Ceramics Show Also Exciting," 

Los Angeles Examiner, March 17, 1957, Section 5, illus. 
Stewart, Virginia. "After 23 Years of Work a New 
Direction in the Quest for Essence," Los Angeles Times: 
Home Magazine Section, May 5, 1 957, pp. 22-23, 
56, illus. 

1 958 "California Ceramists See Their International Exhibit 
Winner," Syracuse Herald Journal, November 8. 
1958, illus. 

"Gertrud and Otto Natzler," Design Quarterly, 
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, nos. 42-43, 1958, 
pp. 30-31, 60, illus. 

Jewish Theological Seminary. Jewish Museum, New 
York. Natzler, [Exhibition catalogue], 1958, illus. 

1 959 "Keramik von Gertrud und Otto Natzler," Neue 
Ziircher Zeitung, Zurich, April 1 0, 1 959, p. 1 1 . 
Rotzler, Willy. "Keramik von Gertrud und Otto 
Natzler," Werk, vol. 46, September 1959, illus. 
Simmons, Edith Weigle. "Oriental Influence Felt 
Strongly in American Ceramic Ware," Asahi Evening 
News, Asahi, Japan, September 3, 1 959. 

Zurich. Kunstgewerbemuseum. Keramik von Gertrud 
und Otto Natzler, [Exhibition catalogue], 1959, illus. 

1 960 H., U. "Keramik von Gertrud und Otto Natzler," 
Werk, vol. 46, June 1960, sup. 130. 

1961 Barnes, Jeanne. "Natzlers to Exhibit Ceramics in 
Dallas' Contemporary House," The Dallas Morning 
News, February 18, 1961, Section III, p. 2. 

1 963 Townsend, Dorothy. "Wind and Rain Play Gentle 
Symphony on Ceramic Bells," Los Angeles Times, 
March 19, 1963, Part IV, pp. 1,9, illus. 
Weigle, Edith. "Age-Old Beauty in a New Guise," 
Chicago Tribune: Magazine Section, April 21,1 963, 
pp. 32, 33, illus. 

1 964 Barnes, Jeanne. "Current Form of Ancient Art Ranks 
With Collectors Items," The Dallas Morning News, 
May 7, 1964, Section III, p. 2, illus. 

Natzler, Otto. "Natzler Glazes," Craft Horizons, 
vol. 24, no. 4, July 1 964, pp. 24-27, 39, 40, 41 , illus. 

1965 Hoffman, Marilyn. "Team of Potters," The Christian 
Science Monitor, March 24, 1965, p. 12, illus. 
Millier, Arthur. "'Moon Rock' Pottery," Los Angeles 
Herald Examiner, June 20, 1965, illus. 

Ploen, Erik. "Fra Amerikanske Keramikkverksteder," 
Bonytt, Norway, No. 11-12, 1965, pp. 303-304, illus. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

Burton W. Chace, Chairman 

Frank G. Bonelli 

Ernest E. Debs 

Warren M. Dorn 

Kenneth Hahn 

Lindon S. Hollinger, 

Chief Administrative Officer 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 

Board of Trustees Staff 

Edward W. Carter, President Kenneth Donahue, Acting Director 

Howard Ahmanson, Vice President Henry T. Hopkins, Chief of Educational Services 

Sidney F. Brody, Vice President Talmadge L. Reed, Chief of Museum Operation, 

Mrs. Freeman Gates. Vice President William Osmun, Senior Curator 

Franklin D. Murphy, Vice President Ebria Feinblatt, Curator of Prints and Drawings 



Mrs. Rudolph Liebig, Secretary 

Maynard J. Toll, Treasurer 

Mrs. Aerol Arnold 

Theodore E. Cummings 

Justin Dart 

Charles E. Ducommun 

Joseph B. Koepfli 

Charles O. Matcham 

Taft B. Schreiber 

William T. Sesnon, Jr. 

Richard E. Sherwood 

Norton Simon 

Mrs. Kellogg Spear 

Mrs. Stuart E. Weaver, Jr. 



Stefania P. Holt, Curator of Textiles and Costumes 

George Kuwayama, Curator of Oriental Art 

Gregor Norman- Wilcox, Curator of Decorative Arts 

Maurice Tuchman, Curator of Modern Art 

Larry Curry, Assistant Curator 

Eugene I. Holt, Assistant Curator 

Ann A. Lafferty, Assistant Curator 

Gloria Cortella, Administrative Assistant, 
Curatorial Division 

Dorothe Curtis, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Services Division 

Robert Meldonian, Education Specialist 

L. Clarice Davis, Librarian 

Frieda Kay Fall, Registrar 

Kathryn Leech, Assistant Registrar 



2500 copies of this catalog, - 

designed by 

Tom Woodward, 

Lithographed by 

Koltun Bros., 

were published for the 

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 

June 1966. 

Photographs by 

Julius Shulman